An Accidental Marketer

Observations. Opinions. Oddities.

12 notes

terresauvage:

Emily Carr
Lamp, c.1924-1927
~
From Heffel Fine Arts:

During the period when Emily Carr was virtually not painting, one of the multitude of things she did to make a living was to produce pottery painted with native motifs. One of the most rewarding aspects for her in the process was in the researching of Haida motifs, from books such as John Swanton’s Ethnography of the Haida and museums such as the National Museum in Ottawa. Gerta Moray writes, “She transferred the two-dimensional designs used by the Haida on hats or on argillite plates to the surfaces of large ceramic bowls and platters, and she made lamp stands in the form of miniature totem posts of bears and beavers.”

The lamp is signed “Klee Wyck” which means ”Laughing One”, apparently a nickname given to Carr by the Indigenous people of the west coast (although she didn’t specify which nation).

terresauvage:

Emily Carr

Lamp, c.1924-1927

~

From Heffel Fine Arts:

During the period when Emily Carr was virtually not painting, one of the multitude of things she did to make a living was to produce pottery painted with native motifs. One of the most rewarding aspects for her in the process was in the researching of Haida motifs, from books such as John Swanton’s Ethnography of the Haida and museums such as the National Museum in Ottawa. Gerta Moray writes, “She transferred the two-dimensional designs used by the Haida on hats or on argillite plates to the surfaces of large ceramic bowls and platters, and she made lamp stands in the form of miniature totem posts of bears and beavers.”

The lamp is signed “Klee Wyck” which means ”Laughing One”, apparently a nickname given to Carr by the Indigenous people of the west coast (although she didn’t specify which nation).

614 notes

5centsapound:

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish descent, graduated from the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in British Columbia. In combining his own experiences with a political perspective, he paints landscapes with vivid, acidic colours, merging Native iconography with a surrealist influence to address West Coast Native issues (*with searing and unapologetic detail)

[…]Yuxweluptun has chosen art as a way to voice his political concerns, exposing environmental destruction and the struggle of Native people. He believes that his artwork stimulates dialogue between Native and non-Native people.

Fucking Creeps They’re Environmental Terrorists, 2013 

THE IMPENDING NISGA’A DEAL. LAST STAND. CHUMP CHANGE.1996

Scorched Earth, Clear-cut Logging on Native Sovereign Land. 1991

MONEY, POWER, GREED,  2012

THE DIRECTION OF LAND CLAIM NEGOTIATIONS 2013

Burying Another Face of Racism on First Nations Soil,1997

Usufruct 1995

INDIAN WORLD MY HOME AND NATIVE LAND 2012

Yuxweluptun is Salish for “man of many masks,” a name given to the artist during his initiation into the Sxwaixwe Society at the age of fourteen. It is Cowishan Salish belief that the Sxwaixwe is a supernatural being who came down from the sky to live at the bottom of a lake. There is a dance associated with this creature in which the mask plays an important role. Yuxweluptun explains, “You carry the mask that belongs to your family and you identify with the animal on the mask.” (Robin Laurence, “Man of Masks,” Canadian Art, Spring 1995).

(via icanwonder)